Meet Eileen and Fawad!

National Engineers Week winds to a close – and we saved two of the best for last!

Eileen Duarte

Eileen Duarte

Meet Eileen Duarte!

What’s your title at National Grid and what do you do?
Principle Engineer, Distribution Asset Management.  I manage our capital improvement programs and strategies for substation assets throughout New England and New York.

Where are you from?
I grew up in Weymouth, Massachusetts.  After living in six additional US states, I decided to settle in Pelham, New Hampshire to experience the ocean, mountains, and lots of snow!

What’s the project you feel the most proud working on here at National Grid?
I am most proud of working on the mobile metal clad switchgear unit because it is presently a non-existing asset at the company and will “pack a punch” in regards to improvements gained, such as customer restoration activities and maintenance and construction activities associated with metal clad switchgear designed stations.

Who or what was your biggest influence to become an engineer?
My biggest influence to become an engineer stems from my mechanical engineering colleagues and friends from Exxon Pipeline Company in Houston, Texas where I worked for 8 years.  I had the utmost admiration for them and their accomplishments.

If you could write a book about an engineering topic – what would it be about?
Collecting operational and conditional data remotely from a substation, and the tools used to collect, analyze, rank and prioritize necessary action plans.  Any other day may be about a different topic because I truly believe an engineer could write a book about anything they want if they put their mind to it.

If engineers were a type of animal – what type of animal would they be and why?
As I look around me and see a sea of cubicles with everyone’s head down and focused on their work (we engineers are hardworking!) I am reminded of the prairie dog. Their habitat is a sea of potholes and they pop their heads up only when there is a disturbance.

If someone gave you a deserted island – what’s the first thing you would build on it?
I would build a fully-functional tiki bar and distillery with a bell for happy hour notification.

What is something you think will become obsolete in 10 years as a result of engineering advances?
I believe that time-based maintenance will be obsolete in 10 years if not sooner.  As we continue to make advances in online monitoring equipment and collection data systems, maintenance will be performed based upon condition and impact.

Describe a word beginning with the first letter of your name that sums you up?
Earnest

What’s the best thing about being an engineer at National Grid?
The best thing about being an engineer at National Grid is the opportunities the company provides so that an engineer can expand their knowledge and satisfy their natural instinct to solve problems.

Fawad Amjad

Fawad Amjad

Meet Fawad Amjad!

What’s your title at National Grid and what do you do?
Operations & Maintenance Engineer – responsible for maintaining critical assets

Where are you from?
Ontario, Canada

What’s the project you feel the most proud working on here at National Grid?
Being part of the Substation Engineering & Design Team and maintaining critical assets. 

Who or what was your biggest influence to become an engineer?
My Father – he was also an engineer and worked on different Hydro Projects. 

If you could write a book about an engineering topic – what would it be about?
Principals of Maintenance & Design

If engineers were a type of animal – what type of animal would they be and why?
Ants – Consistent, hardworking and they plan for the future.

If someone gave you a deserted island – what’s the first thing you would build on it?
A light house – so someone can rescue me!

What is something you think will become obsolete in 10 years as a result of engineering advances?
The way we operate as a utility. With modern metering, controls and integration tools, we are shifting from electromechanical relays to automated systems and digital controls and monitoring.

Describe a word beginning with the first letter of your name that sums you up?
Felicitous – Well suited, well-chosen, suitable for the purpose.

What’s the best thing about being an engineer at National Grid?
Being constantly engaged and involved in day-to-day operational activities. Supporting the field and ensuring a safe working environment gives me a sense of accomplishment.

One Comment

Dana Simone

It’s been fun and educational to read these profiles. Given the chance to visit a deserted island, I must admit I’d choose Eileen’s.

Reply

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