Meet Babek and Leomary!

Profiles of two more fantastic engineers as we continue celebrating National Engineers Week.

Babak Enayati

Babak Enayati

Meet Babak Enayati!

What’s your title at National Grid and what do you do?
Lead Research Development and Demonstration Engineer, Utility of the Future. I work on projects that have the potential to improve system/customer reliability and resiliency.

Where are you from?
Iran

Which project do you feel the most proud working on here at National Grid?
MA Grid Modernization

Who or what was your biggest influence to become an engineer?
My father, who is a telecommunication engineer.

 If you could write a book about an engineering topic – what would it be about?What it means to be an engineer!

If engineers were a type of animal – what type of animal would they be and why?
Ants. Because ants are hardworking and have the capability to carry load much bigger than their body size. 

If someone gave you a deserted island – what’s the first thing you would build on it?
A resort so people can enjoy the beach.

What is something you think will become obsolete in 10 years as a result of engineering advances?
Industry standards. As technology changes, new methods of resolving grid issues get established, hence, the standards need will be revised to address these changes.

Describe a word beginning with the first letter of your name that sums you up?
Bookish

What’s the best thing about being an engineer at National Grid?
Teamwork with outstanding engineers and leaders.

Leomary Bader

Leomary Bader

Meet Leomary Bader!

What’s your title at National Grid and what do you do?
Lead Engineer for the Gas Transmission Engineering Department.I manage mandated inspections and direct assessment inspections for natural gas transmission pipelines in MA and RI,making sure we are compliant with Federal and State code requirements.

Where are you from?
I was born in the Dominican Republic. My family moved to Massachusetts when I was 17.

Which project do you feel the most proud working on here at National Grid?
The recent in-line inspection project for the Distrigas to the Mystic Power Plant pipeline in Everett, MA.The project was unique because we had a 48 hour timeline to complete it. We also had to burn a large quantity of gas using a 100 foot long portable flarestack in the heart of the city of Everett.

Who or what was your biggest influence to become an engineer?
My grandmother was the biggest influence in completing my schooling.  She always used to tell me that the key to success was education. Those words were engraved in my brain.

If you could write a book about an engineering topic – what would it be about?
In-line inspection of gas pipelines utilizing smart tools.

If engineers were a type of animal – what type of animal would they be and why?
Honey Badgers.Honey Badgers are smart and tenacious animals that don’t stop at anything until they accomplish their goals.

If someone gave you a deserted island – what’s the first thing you would build on it?
The first thing I would build is a shack.

What is something you think will become obsolete in 10 years as a result of engineering advances?
Landlines, CDs, Cable TV

Describe a word beginning with the first letter of your name that sums you up?
Leader

What’s the best thing about being an engineer at National Grid?
There are many good things about being an engineer at National Grid, and I feel privileged.

I’m given the freedom to make significant decisions independently. My manager and director empower me to achieve success with the proper level of support while helping me grow as a professional.

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